Monday, May 11, 2009

"Fiddler" by the numbers

Because it now seems all I can marshal my brain resources to do is cite statistics rather than write actual blog posts, here is a rundown of my "Fiddler on the Roof" experience.


The How
  • Number of times I auditioned: 0, because I initially decided I didn't want to do it
  • Number of personal requests to become involved: 1, because they didn't have enough guys
  • Number of personal requests to become involved I probably should have rejected: 1*
  • Role I initially agreed to play/lines I agreed to speak: Chorus/0


The What
  • Role I ended up playing: Mendel, the Rabbi's son
  • Number of lines I spoke in Act 1: 30
  • Number of lines I spoke in Act 2: 7
  • Most ridiculous line: "And the cheese!"


The When
  • First rehearsal I attended: Saturday, March 21
  • Last rehearsal I attended: Thursday, May 7
  • Number of hours of rehearsal I attended: 53
  • Number of rehearsals I missed: 1
  • Number of performances: 2
  • Performance length: 2 hours, 40 minutes
  • First performance: Saturday, May 9
  • Last performance: Sunday, May 10


The Who
  • Number of cast and crew: At least 60
  • Percentage of cast from St. Luke's: About 33%
  • Percentage of cast from Beth-El Zedeck: About 33%
  • Percentage of unaffiliated cast: About 33%
  • Number of minutes spent discussing interfaith stuff during rehearsal time: 40
  • Number of new friends I made: I'd say 8 or 10


The Results

  • Number of audience members: about 2,500 over the two performances
  • Funds generated to fight hunger in central Indiana and in Kenya: Many thousands of dollars


* I joke, I joke. (Sort of.) Here's my take on the whole experience: I am really glad that I was a part of the show. I learned new skills (dancing) and new vocabulary ("cheat out") and made new friends. I think I did OK with my part -- I don't think I screwed up any of my lines, although the stick-in-the-mud son of the rabbi was probably the closest I could get to typecasting in this production. As a rookie, I was terrified of being the weak link in any of my scenes -- screwing up a dance, flubbing my lines, dropping a prop, etc., so I worked really, really hard to remember all the details. The biggest challenges for me were interpersonal. Like my friend Ernesto, I found cliques developing among the cast, which led to cast members (me, others) sometimes feeling excluded and friends-who-weren't-cast-members also feeling excluded. And like Ernesto, I was frustrated by the self-appointed mini-directors, especially the two who physically took me by the shoulders and moved me to a different spot onstage. So, overall, the experience was very positive, but a few speedbumps along the way will cause me to think long and hard before doing it again.

4 comments:

shouldhavezagged said...

So what is the number of minutes spent discussing interfaith stuff during rehearsal time?

Scott S. Semester said...

D'oh! I forgot to complete that. I put the category in as a placeholder so I would remember to go back and check the calendar and then insert the number, but didn't do it.

For the record, I'm going with "40" -- meaning, we had several three to six minute minichats about Easter, Passover, Siberia, etc., totalling about 40 minutes as in-group presentation stuff. This does not count the informal exchanges that took place almost constantly, especially as the folks from Beth-El schooled us Methodists on proper pronunciation, traditions (like the Wedding scene), etc.

Anonymous said...

Yeah, you're totally going to do it again some day.

Anonymous said...

There's a lot of drama in drama. -- Lisa